TALK 12 - San Francisco REI (Part Four)

 
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PART FOUR

“You mentioned you host workshops, tell me more about that.”

He arrived late, but he was the last to leave. I outlined the different ways that organizations can partner with, support, or hire me/Hiking My Feelings:

Empathy Evolution is the first step. It helps folks identify the lies they’ve been telling themselves, the stories that no longer serve them, these limiting beliefs we all run around with that we may not be aware of. Once we know what they are, we can reframe them. Most of what we believe was taught to us, and we didn’t have the capacity to challenge it or question it. This process helps us do that, so we can arrive at a place where we are making decisions out of love, not fear.

Unpacking Your Trauma Pack takes folks through the process of looking inside this invisible backpack. What’s in it? Who does it belong to? Do I want to keep it? Once we have the awareness of what is weighing us down, who it belongs to, and when we know what we want to do with it, then we can start making progress on unpacking it.

Peak Performance: Summit Your Personal Mountain is a coaching program integrating classroom work and physical movement. Whether the mountain you want to summit is literal or metaphorical, we help with preparation to achieve the goal, accountability in the pursuit of the achievement, and re-integration strategies on how you incorporate the learnings from the experience after you’ve accomplished what you set out to accomplish.

After I finished explaining the different workshops we offer, he said,

“That all sounds amazing. Can you do these presentations with Chinese subtitles?”

“I don’t currently, but if you had a group that was interested in one of these workshops and subtitles were the best way to go, we could absolutely figure it out. What about a translator?” I responded.

“Well, I like the way you deliver it and I don’t want the emotion to get lost in the translation. I’d rather have them listen to you speak and read the subtitles.”

I fell away from the conversation in my brain for a second, visualizing what this would look like. I imagined me in a boardroom full of Chinese-speaking folks who are reading character subtitles as I speak. I panicked a bit, because while the story I tell is the same story at every tour stop, no two are delivered exactly the same. My talk isn’t scripted, it’s outlined, and depending on the energy of the room and the space itself, I’m able to tailor it to the audience a bit. The talk in Berkeley was full of raging laughter and felt more like a stand-up show at times. When three people showed up in Mountain View two days later, my animated delivery was too big for that room, it would have been weird.

I come back to the room, back to my body, back to this conversation:

“Well we will certainly make that work if you have a group that wants it. The number on my business card is my cell phone number so feel free to call or email when you know more and we can talk about how we make it happen.”

After the tour of the van, he was one of the last people to leave. He shook my hand, thanked me for sharing my story, and said he’d be in touch.

So who do I know that can transcribe my talk into Chinese subtitles?


 
 

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